Written by Carol Christen
Wednesday, 21 July 2010 16:48

My talks, workshops and trainings are customized to a group's interests and its member's curiosities about the issues of teen and young adult career choice and job search.  But, listed below are a few that have been so well received that they are worth repeating.

High School Matters - From a career development perspective, the four years of high school are consistently underutilized.  This is unfortunate for many reasons.  Chief among them is that high school may be the only time when young people have all the time they need to explore all the jobs that interest them.  While parents are paying the bills is the best time to explore careers and make a detailed plan for post high school success.

Why 15? - Research has shown that 15 is the best age to begin developing teens career maturity.  Learn high school students can do each year to develop achievable career plans.

Don't Settle - Who wants a half-life?  Passion, interests and what you enjoy matter greatly when picking a career, changing jobs or careers and even in volunteer work. The old dichotomy, do something you love or do something practical that will bring a paycheck is no longer valid (if it ever was).  When connected with activities that excite, people come alive, accomplish amazing things and earn quite a bit of money too.

What's Going On? - Over 17 million college graduates are working at jobs that don't need their level of education.  Half of all recent college grads are getting jobs they could have gotten right out of high school. Some high school drop outs are earning more than high school grads. Learn the trends that have made this happen and how young adults can still achieve their education goals without going broke.

Cost:   Depends on travel expenses and type of presentation (keynote, workshop, etc.)

To Book (or get more details):  Please email Carol at carolchristen dot com

 

“The impact of Carol Christen’s presentation at St Cuthbert's College, Auckland New Zealand was immense, and all positive. Carol’s breadth of knowledge and range of experience saw her share invaluable insights into the journey young people embark on through school toward the world of future study and work.

 

“… her real strength was her ability to capture an audience’s attention: parents and adolescents hanging on her every word. Carol’s infectious love of life and warmth coupled with a most credible research background makes it impossible not to sit up and listen. At times you could hear audible sighs of relief for parents and students alike as Carol debunked myths about career planning and took the fear out of considering the future.

Especially encouraging was Carol’s emphasis on not seeing the first post-school destination as one that would set a student’s future in concrete. Her gentle, gracious encouragement of the young to celebrate the fabulous world that lies ahead and to seize opportunities without hesitation or fear was empowering. Equally her interest in the parenting process and empathy for parents watching their children evolve saw parents nodding as she spoke.

“It was a privilege to host Carol at our school and our doors will always be open to her in the future, should we be that lucky that she ventures this way again.”

—Jenny Scott, Career Counselor St. Cuthberts College Auckland, New Zealand